Career Development


Career Exploration

Explore the next step of your career: discover job families at the University, learn about professional development opportunities, and take assessments to find the right fit for you.

  • Career Development Compass

    The Career Development Compass is a “one-stop-shop” listing of professional development opportunities specific to your job. Use the Compass to find a wide range of activities and networking opportunities that match up with your skills, interests, and career goals. Each set of activities is divided into five main categories: professional organizations, events and training, education and certifications, independent learning, and on-the-job activities.

    Expand your knowledge in your field and take the next step on your leadership journey!

    Professional Organizations: Joining a professional organization provides excellent networking opportunities and the ability to stay current on trends and information in your field. Many of these organizations also provide development activities and additional resources for their members.

    Events and Training: Attending conferences, events, or training can help you to expand your skills or knowledge in different areas of your job. These activities often focus on one specific topic in your field so you can apply this information to your everyday responsibilities.

    Education and Certifications*: Getting a degree or a certification in your field is a great way to learn in a structured environment and boost your credentials. Taking individual courses in your career field is another way to advance your professional growth.

    Independent Learning: Independent learning activities provide you with flexible options to focus on your professional growth. These activities can be as simple as reading an article on a subject in your field or joining a professional organization’s social media group to stay up-to-date on information.

    On-the-job activities: A significant part of your career development occurs on-the-job. There are many skill-building activities that you can incorporate into your work, including mentoring, job shadowing, conducting informational interviews, networking, and soliciting feedback.

    *Education and certification resources listed are not all-inclusive. Preferred education may vary widely in each sub-family. Reference the UVA job structure tool for typical education information per job title.

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  • Assessments

    When it comes to finding a career that’s a good fit, the first step is to be clear about your skills, preferences, interests, and values. Try these online assessments to start the process.

    Career Assessments:

    • Virginia Wizard - Provides valuable information on a variety of careers. You can also learn what skills and abilities are required for each career.
    • i seek careers – A comprehensive site that includes an on-line skills and interests assessment and various exploratory exercises.
    • ONet Skills Search - The Department of Labor’s ONet Online site that provides a wealth of information on occupations and careers. SkillsSearch helps you identify potential occupations based on your customized skill list.
    • Franklin Covey Mission Statement Builder - Provides a step-by-step process to write your personal mission statement which can be very helpful as you begin the process of career exploration. A personal mission statement can help to add focus, direction, and a sense of purpose to one’s life.
    • Identify Your Strengths - Use this form to identify your strengths, helping you to develop a career that enables you to feel engaged and energized.
    • Keirsey Temperament Assessment - Looks at personality traits, such as habits of communication, patterns of action, and sets of characteristic attitudes, values, and talents. It also encompasses personal needs, the kinds of contributions that individuals make in the workplace, and the roles they play in society.
    • Jungian Theory - Based on Carl Jung and Isabel Myers-Briggs typology (Myers- Briggs Type Indicator or MBTI). This assessment’s approach to personality and careers is based on “preferences.” For further information on your assessed type, look at MBTI Profiles.

    Self-Assessments:

    • The Riley Guide is a comprehensive directory of career information sources and services on the Internet. Richard Bolles, author of “What Color is Your Parachute”, said about The Riley Guide, “This is the best by far. If I could only go to one gateway job site on the Web, this would be it.”
    • The Career Key - On-line assessments for a small fee.
  • Occupational Outlook Handbook

    The Department of Labor provides information on a variety of career options to explore.

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  • Networking and Informational Interviews

    University Career Services provides helpful tips on networking and informational interviews.

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